Bunion is the thickening or swilling of the joints of your toe. In this condition, a bump is formed near the big toe which causes it to tilt toward the second toe. When the swapping rubs against the footwear is can increase the pain. Even though he pain can be reduced by using special footwear, using relief aids or surgery is the only long-term solution to the problem.

Choosing Bunion Surgery

Preparing for the Surgery

Before the surgery, it is in your interest that you inform the doctor the medication that you are taking. If you are an habitual smoker or drinker, make sure you discuss these activities with your doctor as it could have an impact on your healing. At times, two weeks before the operation, the doctor may ask the patient to stop taking a few drugs. Also, if you have serious problems like high blood pressure or heart diseases, it is best that you consult a specialist before the operation.

On the day of the operation, your doctor may ask you not to eat anything for at least 12 hours before the operation. The medical assistant may also give you details items that you must bring to the hospital.

Surgery

To correct the problem, the surgeon will make a small incision on the foot to expose the toe bone and the joint. Before starting the operation the surgeon gives the patient an option to choose between local and general anesthesia. When local anesthesia is used, the legs become numb but the person remains awake. However, when general anesthesia is used the person is put to sleep. The surgeon will then use several techniques to correct the problem like removing the ligaments and the bone of the damaged area, realigning the bone and ligaments with screws, plate and wire. It is a simple surgery and usually patients return home within 24 hours after the surgery is performed.

Recovering from the Operation

Like any other surgery, there are some standard risks that are associated with bunion surgery. Some of the problems that you will face after the surgery include infection, blood clots, bleeding, allergies and breathing problems. Some of the risk associated with the surgery includes poor healing, numbness of the toe, nerve damage and return of bunion.

Recovering from the operation may take six weeks and the patient is usually required to keep their foot in an elevated position for 7 days. During the recovery period, the patient may not able to put pressure on their foot. At times, patients who experience pain when putting pressure on their foot may have to take pain killers to ease the pain.